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The Latest on the Coronavirus — June

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6/26/2020:
    
This Week's Statistics:
          Florida Department of Health's dashboard
         
Florida's COVID-19 Action dashboard
     Texas & Florida Order Bars to Close Again
     New Spike in Cases Due to Rush to Open
    
Conservative Media Fostering Confusion & Complacency    
    
European Union (EU) Considering Banning American Travelers
     Quarantine Ordered on Travelers from FL, AZ & TX
     Expanded List of Those at Increased Risk of Severe Illness
     Three New Symptoms Added
     NPR Segment About Understanding "Asymptomatic"
    

6/19/2020:
    
This Week's Statistics:
          Florida Department of Health's dashboard
         
Florida's COVID-19 Action dashboard
    
A Different Approach to Treatment — Passive Immunity
    
1st Evidence That a Drug Can Improve COVID-19 Survival
     Close Toilet Seat Before Flushing
    
Florida May Be the Next COVID-19 Epicenter
     Blood Type May Influence Severity of the Virus
     Virus in Italy as Early as
December
     Cape Canaveral Monitoring Raw Sewage for Community Spread

     California Mandates Masks Following Spike in Cases
     Tips If Going to the Beach
     Microsoft Developed COVID-19 Contact Tracing App
     Other Nations Launched Contact-Tracing Smart Phone Apps
    

6/12/2020:
    
This Week's Statistics
     FL increase in cases after restrictions eased
     Must Know Who's Been Exposed If Country to Return to Normal
     CDC's New COVID-19 Advice After Months of Silence
    
Understanding How the Virus is Spread May Be Shifting
     Virus May Have Hit Wuhan Earlier Than Thought
     
States are Still Wrestling with How to Test More People
    
6/5/2020:
    
This Week's Statistics
     Hydroxychloroquine Did Not Prevent the Virus
     Deaths in Nursing Homes Undercounted
     Some Have No Symptoms and Are Spreading Covid-19
     Caronavirus Can Infect Blood Vessels
     No Evidence Pets Spread the Virus to Their Humans

 

Friday, June 26th

The following has been learned this past week.

  • I am continuing giving you statistics from two dashboards (statistics presented in easy to understand overviews) or data portals:
    Florida's Dept. of Health (DOH) statistics (developed by Rebekah Jones) and Florida's Community Coronavirus statistics (also developed by Rebekah Jones). There is still quite a difference.

    Per the Florida Department of Health's dashboard* as of Friday, June 26th, the state now has 120,574 residents testing positive for COVID-19 (a spike of 30,826 cases this past week, yesterday having the biggest spike ever... 8,933 just for 6/25), with 13,987 requiring hospitalization (up by 2,281 hospitalizations this past week), and 3,366 deaths (up by 489 deaths this past week). The breakdown of confirmed cases in our tri-county area is:
    • Sumter County: 313 cases (up by 36 cases), holding at 17 deaths — age range steady: 4 — 92
    • Lake County: 975 cases (another spike of 329 cases), 22 deaths (an increase of 7 deaths) — age range steady: 0 — 103
    • Marion County: 524 cases (another spike of 233 cases), 10 deaths (an increase of 2 deaths) — age range steady: 0 — 97
       
    Per the Florida's Community Coronavirus dashboard as of Friday, June 26th, the state now has 97,346 cases testing positive for COVID-19 since March 1st, new cases today alone: 89,748 (a spike of 36,052 new cases this past week), with 14,281 requiring hospitalization (up by 2,575 hospitalizations this past week), and 3,464 deaths (up by 587 deaths this past week). The breakdown of confirmed cases in our tri-county area is:
    • Sumter County: 354 cases (41 cases more than DOH's numbers), holding at 17 deaths (same as DOH's numbers)
    • Lake County: 1,075 cases (551 more cases than DOH's numbers), 23 deaths (just 1 more than DOH's numbers)
    • Marion County: 579 cases (55 more cases than DOH's numbers), holding at 10 deaths (same as DOH's numbers)

    The report card for counties that meet the state's criteria (minimum of two weeks of declining cases) for the next phase of reopening. Only three counties have met that criteria: Gulf County, Franklin County & Liberty County (two more than last week). Again, none in our tri-county area have met the criteria, but they are still reopening.

    This dashboard also gives a Social Distancing (6-feet from others) grade to each county. All three counties continue to get an F (failing) grade.

    Rebekah Jones has created this "community-based dashboard that doesn't hide or fudge numbers", which she hopes to fund through GoFundMe donations or a Florida COVID Action site, where you can also donate using PayPal. Read the whole June 14th NPR (National Public Radio) story.

     

  • Today, Texas and Florida ordered bars to close (correction: no serving alcohol) due to non-compliance with state guidelines, just weeks after celebrating their reopening, as the number of coronavirus cases have continued to skyrocket in these states. Florida health officials reported 8,942 new infections today, June 26th, eclipsing a previous single-day record of 5,511 set just two days ago. Fatalities are also increasing, with 39 new deaths announced today. The state has ramped up diagnostic testing recently, but the rate of positive cases has climbed significantly over the past two weeks — a clear sign that the spread of the virus is accelerating. According to Florida health officials, more than 13% of the most recent tests came back positive, up from about 5—7% earlier in the month.
     
    Gov. Ron DeSantis has pushed an aggressive reopening strategy and it appears that Florida is fast emerging as a new epicenter for the virus.
    (Let's hope not, but as the virus continues to spread into The Villages, wear your masks when going out where you might be in contact with others, try to practice 6-feet social distancing, wash your hands or sanitize them frequently, and sanitize surfaces that are frequently touched, like door knobs, home phones, etc. Stay safe, Lynnhaven!)
     
  • After state health departments reported 38,115 new infections on Wednesday, the highest single-day caseload in the U.S. since the pandemic began, CDC Director Robert Redfield said Thursday, "Our best estimate right now is that for every case that’s reported, there actually are 10 other infections.The new spike was caused by a rush to reopen without proper safety measures in place, infectious-disease experts say, and the push to do so, even as cases climb, sends a dangerous and inaccurate message. This conclusion was based on antibody tests. He believes 5—8% of the population has been infected so far, leaving 92—95% of the population still susceptible. Some officials in the Trump administration, including the president, argue the surging cases simply reflect expanded testing. But infectious-disease experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, dispute that, saying they also reflect increased community transmission. Redfield said that younger people are the leading edge of that transmission.
     
  • Experts say there are many reasons the U.S. response to the pandemic has faltered, but three recent studies have focused on conservative media's role in fostering confusion and complacency. The studies paint a picture of a media ecosystem that amplifies misinformation, entertains conspiracy theories and discourages audiences from taking concrete steps to protect themselves and others. As a result, the U.S. is on a markedly different pandemic trajectory than other wealthy nations. "We are receiving an incredible number of studies and solid data showing that consuming far-right media and social media content was strongly associated with low concern about the virus at the onset of the pandemic,” said Irene Pasquetto, chief editor of the Harvard Kennedy School Misinformation Review, which published one of the studies. Administering a nationally representative phone survey with 1,008 respondents, they found that people who got most of their information from mainstream print and broadcast outlets tended to have an accurate assessment of the severity of the pandemic and their risks of infection.
     
  • It was reported this week that the European Union (EU) is considering banning American travelers. While average weekly coronavirus cases in the 47 EU nations dropped significantly from a mid-March peak of more than 30,000 cases to 4,000 cases in June, the U.S. has failed to substantially curb the virus, and since the beginning of June, cases are again on the rise. In their view, the U.S. has failed at "bending the curve" of coronavirus cases when compared to Spain, Italy, Germany, Finland and South Korea. Compared to the EU's average 4,000 cases in June, the U.S. is reporting 24,000 cases. And, the U.S. is still only administering 20 to 40 tests per case of coronavirus, while other countries listed on the graph are all conducting 1,000 to 5,000 tests per case despite having fewer confirmed cases. Admitting Americans to their countries may jeopardize the progress they've made toward curbing the number of infections and deaths that they've made.
     
  • On the domestic front, New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut have ordered mandatory, 14-day quarantines for people traveling from states with high coronavirus infection rate averages. Right now, that means Florida, Arizona, Texas and six others currently in the grip of surging cases and hospitalizations meet the threshold of experiencing "significant community spread," according to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, whose state was once the virus' American epicenter. "We also have to make sure the virus doesn’t come on a plane again," he said. New York will be enforcing the measure with judicial orders and fines starting at $2,000.
     
  • Thursday, the CDC updated and expanded the list of who is at increased risk for getting severely ill from COVID-19 based on a detailed review of available evidence to date. Older adults and people with underlying medical conditions remain at increased risk for severe illness, but it has removed the specific age threshold and it’s not just those over 65 who are at increased risk for severe illness. There was consistent evidence (from multiple small studies or a strong association from a large study) that specific conditions increase a person’s risk of severe COVID-19 illness: chronic kidney disease, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), obesity (BMI of 30 or higher), a weakened immune system from solid organ transplant, serious heart conditions (i.e., heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathy), and sickle cell disease. The CDC also clarified the list of other conditions that might increase a person’s risk of severe illness, including additions such as: asthma, high blood pressure, neurologic conditions (e.g., dementia), cerebrovascular disease (e.g., stroke), cystic fibrosis, high blood pressure, liver disease, damaged or scarred lung tissues, smoking, Thalassemia (a type of blood disorder), Type 1 diabetes mellitus, and pregnancy. 
     
  • The CDC also recently added three new symptoms of the novel coronavirus to its ongoing list on Thursday. Congestion or runny nose, nausea, and diarrhea were added, joining the federal agency’s list that already included fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell and sore throat. The CDC said that this list doesn't include all possible symptom, but they will update the list as more is learned about the virus. (Click on chart on the left for an updated chart of possible symptoms.)
     
  • Tuesday, NPR (National Public Radio) featured a segment about understanding "asymptomatic". Even if someone is infected by the virus and remains asymptomatic — free of coughing, fever, fatigue and other common signs of infection, it doesn't mean that the virus isn't taking a toll. It could still be causing harm to lungs. A new paper in Nature Medicine, published June 18, documents the clinical patterns of asymptomatic infections, finding that many of those studied developed signs of minor lung inflammation (akin to walking pneumonia) while exhibiting no other symptoms of the coronavirus. Asymptomatic coronavirus carriers are hard to find and study because people usually only get tested if they think they may have it. The paper analyzed 37 asymptomatic cases found through the contact tracing and testing — 57% showed lung abnormalities on a CT scan while others showed signs of lung inflammation. The study also found pieces of the coronavirus in swab samples from asymptomatic patients for an average of 19 days (5 days longer than a control group with mild symptoms). While it doesn't mean asymptomatic people are infectious the whole time, it does suggest they're capable of spreading it to others at some point in their infections — that's why it's so important for people to wear a mask when going out.


Friday, June 19th

The following has been learned this past week.

  • This week I am giving you statistics from two dashboards (statistics presented in easy to understand overviews) or data portals:
    Florida's Dept. of Health (DOH) statistics (developed by Rebekah Jones) and Florida's Community Coronavirus statistics (also developed by Rebekah Jones). There is quite a difference.

    Per the Florida Department of Health's dashboard as of Friday, June 19th, the state now has 89,748 cases testing positive for COVID-19 (up by 18,777 cases this past week), with 11,706 (up by 1,068 cases this past week) requiring hospitalization and 2,877 deaths (up by 227 deaths this past week). The breakdown of confirmed cases in our tri-county area is:
    • Sumter County: 277 cases (up by 24 cases), holding at 17 deaths — age range now 4 — 92 (victims getting younger)
    • Lake County: 646 cases (a spike of 355 cases), 15 deaths (an increase of 4 deaths)age range 0 — 103
    • Marion County: 233 cases (a spike of 132 cases), 8 deaths (an increase of 2 deaths)age range 0 — 97

     

    Per the Florida's Community Coronavirus dashboard as of Friday, June 19th, the state now has 97,346 cases testing positive for COVID-19 since March 1st, new cases today alone: 3,819with 11,706 requiring hospitalization and 2,877 deaths. The breakdown of confirmed cases in our tri-county area is:
    • Sumter County: 314 cases (37 cases more than DOH's numbers), holding at 17 deaths (same as DOH's numbers)
    • Lake County: 737 cases (91 more cases than DOH's numbers), 15 deaths (5 more than DOH's numbers)
    • Marion County: 409 cases (176 more cases than DOH's numbers), 10 deaths (5 more than DOH's numbers)

    The report card for counties that meet the state's criteria (minimum of two weeks of declining cases) for the next phase of reopening shows that none of the three counties have met that criteria but are still reopening. Liberty County is the only county that does meet the criteria.

    This dashboard also gives a Social Distancing (6-feet from others) grade to each county. All three counties got an F (failing) grade.

    Rebekah Jones had created the Department of Health's data portal (the first stats shown above), but was fired from her job last month. She says it was because she refused to alter data when it became apparent that Florida had not met its criteria for a phase two reopening of the state. Since then, she has created "a community-based dashboard that doesn't hide or fudge numbers", which she hopes to fund through GoFundMe donations or a Florida COVID Action site, where you can also donate using PayPal. Read the whole June 14th NPR (National Public Radio) story.
     

  • Researchers are testing antiviral antibodies to see if they can block the coronavirus from infecting cells. Antibody therapies represent a different approach to treatment, called passive immunity. About 18 companies are working on antibody therapies and are starting trials. A team led by Regeneron has created a cocktail of two antibodies, which is already being tested for safety on humans. The protection offered by antibodies wears off relatively quickly, so several doses might be needed. Can the therapy be used before exposure to prevent infection, used early on to lessen the severity of symptoms for a quicker recovery? These and other questions have yet to be answered.
     
  • A new study shows that treating people with On Tuesday, the Associated Press (AP) reported that researchers in England claim to have the first evidence that a drug can improve COVID-19 survival. It's cheap, widely available, and has reduced deaths by up to one third in severely ill hospitalized patients; it's a steroid called dexamethasone. The British government immediately authorized the drug’s use across the United Kingdom for coronavirus patients like those who did well in the study. Even though dexamethasone only helps in severe cases and has serious side effects, countless lives will be saved globally. Until now, the only drug shown to help fight COVID-19 is remdesivir, an experimental drug that blocks an enzyme the virus uses to copy its genetic material, which shortened the time severely ill patients had to be hospitalized from 15 days to 11 days on average.
     
  • It was reported on June 16th that another way of protecting against the virus is to close the toilet seat before flushing. Scientists simulated toilet water and air flows and found that aerosol droplets forced upward by a flush appear to spread wide enough and linger long enough to be inhaled. The novel coronavirus has been found in the feces of covid-19 patients, but it remains unknown whether such clouds could contain enough virus to infect a person. And if the toilet doesn't have a lid, be sure to wash your hands very well.
     
  • On June 19th, WebMD cautions that Florida may be the next COVID-19 epicenter. On Wednesday, Florida reported more than 3,200 new cases, the largest single-day count in the state since the pandemic. Gov. DeSantis has been criticized for reopening his state too quickly after being deluged with spring break and Memorial Day crowds, but he says he won’t slow down the economy. On the other hand, those areas that had waited longer to reopen or are reopening more slowly, they have moved through the holiday and mass demonstrations for racial justice without a significant change in their forecasts.
     
  • CBS News reported that blood type might influence whether you develop a severe case of the virus. Scientists compared the genes of thousands of patients in Europe and found that those with Type A blood were more likely to have severe disease than those with Type O. Wednesday's report in the New England Journal of Medicine doesn't prove a blood type connection, but it does confirm a previous report from China there might be a link. Researchers have been hunting for clues as to why some people get very ill with the disease and others get a milder case.
     
  • BBC News reported that the virus was in Italy as early as December 18th, long before the country's first confirmed cases, adding to evidence from other countries that the virus may have been circulating much earlier than thought. Traces were found in sewage water. Pilot projects monitoring sewage water are starting to see if doing so would be an early detection tool.
     
  • As part of a nation-wide 4-week program to map COVID-19 across the United States by sampling raw sewage, Cape Canaveral Wastewater Treatment Facility was being monitored throughout the month of May. The testing was carried out by Biobot Analytics. No presence of the novel coronavirus was found; that is, until the week of May 26th. They will continue monitoring to see if the virus is spreading. Testing sewage can show if the new virus is increasing or decreasing in a community.
     
  • As California moved forward with reopening various businesses, residents started relaxing their adherence to CDC guidelines. "Simply put, we are seeing too many people with faces uncovered — putting at risk the real progress we have made in fighting the disease," Gov. Gavin Newsom said Thursday. One day after a record spike in coronavirus cases, California registered 3,799 new cases on Thursday, and the governor mandated that all Californians are required to wear face masks in public. Public health officials on Thursday reiterated that the use of face masks can help stop the spread of the disease. Gov. Andrew Cuomo was threatening to do the same thing in New York today.
     
  • Want to head to the beach or pool for some summer fun? The Miami Herald provides some tips like staying 6 feet away from those you don't live with; don't share equipment, toys, food or other supplies like sunscreen; stay home if you or a family member is not feeling well; wear cloth face masks, especially when you can’t stay 6 feet away from others, but don't wear them in the water; arrange chairs for social distancing. There's also a link to the CDC’s beach guidelines.
     
  • June 19th, The Verge reported that Japan is rolling out the Microsoft-developed COVID-19 contact tracing app. The app doesn’t store personal information like your location or phone numbers, but records encrypted data-flagging phones that have been within one meter (3.281 feet) for more than 15 minutes. When one person reports the fact that they have tested positive for COVID-19, those other users will be notified. There is also a video explaining how your phone will track coronavirus.
     
  • WIRED reported that while governments around the world have launched nationwide Covid-19 contact-tracing smart phone apps, the U.S. has not. There is no effort at the national level to build anything like a contact-tracing app, says someone familiar with the White House Covid-19 task force deliberations led by President Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner, speaking to WIRED under the condition of anonymity. "Just like you’ve seen with the plan on testing and reopening, it’s being pushed to the states."



Friday, June 12th

The following has been learned this week.

  • Per the Florida Department of Health, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection, and as of Friday, June 12th, the state now has 70,971 cases testing positive for COVID-19 (spiking again this past week), with 11,706 requiring hospitalization and 2,877 deaths. The breakdown of confirmed cases in our tri-county area is:

    • Sumter County: 253 cases (up by 5 cases), holding at 17 deaths — age range 10 — 92 (they're getting younger)
    • Lake County: 291 cases (a jump of 66 cases), holding at 15 deaths — age range 1 — was 98, now 103
    • Marion County: 233 cases (also a jump of 66 cases, it was 39 last week), holding at 8 deaths — age range 0 — 97

    A disturbing statistic for Sumter County is that 71% of the cases continue to be male. (You guys getting sloppy in following preventative guidelines?) The age range for both Lake and Marion Counties has increased, indicating that more seniors are being stricken.
     

  • On June 12th, Florida had 1,968 new Covid-19 cases, the highest reported in a single day. After slowly being opened in May, Florida businesses are now open at limited capacity with social-distancing regulations in place. Florida is one of 19 states to see a rise in new cases over this past week, with new cases reported to be surpassing 1,000 each day. And on June 11th, CNN reported that the U.S. now has more than 2 million confirmed cases of the virus according to tracking numbers from the Johns Hopkins University and Medicine Coronavirus Research Center.
     
  • Ars Technica shared some disappointing news on June 11th about antibody tests critical for determining whether someone has immunity, how safe those who've recovered from an infection are, and how they can behave responsibly in public. Since testing isn't usually available at the time of an outbreak, doctors need to know who's actually been exposed if the country is to return to anything resembling our pre-pandemic lives. After analyzing the tests that are available to the public, many of the tests show variable results. The small commercial tests didn't do especially well, with less than 80 percent of them correctly identifying the presence of antibodies.
     
  • Friday, June 12th, the CDC issued new Covid-19 advice after three months of silence... two new sets of suggestions for staying safe as restrictions ease: safety considerations for mass gatherings (this was after Trump announced that he's having a large, in-person campaign rally in Tulsa), and safety suggestions for going out again. According to the new guidance, events like rallies make it difficult to maintain 6 feet distances, plus people come from outside the are, increasing the risk of infection. For people going out, the agency emphasized similar distancing precautions for various activities like cookouts, going to a beauty salon, traveling overnight, or going to the gym. Though it offered some context-specific tips, the recommendations generally caution people to stay 6-feet apart, avoid high-touch objects and surfaces, practice hand hygiene, and wear a mask.
     
  • On June 12th, Ars Technica reported that the thinking on how the virus is spread may be shifting. How it spreads remains a frustrating mystery and in trying to understand transmission, there is one consistent finding: that it's inconsistent. Most don't spread the virus during the course of their infection, while others infect dozens at a time. At first they looked at anomalous anecdotes (e.g., a large outbreak from a Washington choir practice), but mounting data suggests that as little as 10—20% of those infected may be responsible for about 80% of transmissions. Super-spreading events tend to occur in specific settings like large social gatherings, nightclubs, and crammed workplaces. It’s very difficult to identify an individual super-spreader, but not difficult to identify events that bring lots of people together in a small, enclosed space.
     
  • The BBC reported on June 9th that as a result of satellite traffic images, the virus may have first hit Wuhan even earlier than November as most recently thought, which hadn't been reported to the WHO until December 31st. Harvard researchers said satellite images show an increase in traffic outside five hospitals in the Chinese city from late August to December and the traffic spike coincided with a rise in online searches for symptoms like "cough" and "diarrhoea". Many studies are still needed to fully uncover what took place and to really learn about how these disease outbreaks emerged in populations, but it is another point of evidence.
     
  • The Washington Post reported on June 10th, months into the pandemic, that states are still wrestling with how to test more people, with state officials having difficult questions about how to measure the spread and make decisions about reopening their economies, with little guidance from the federal government on how to do that. The states are essentially on their own. Faced with conflicting advice from experts, states are using different tests of varying reliability and have adopted a variety of policies about who else should get tested and when — particularly when it comes to asymptomatic people considered to be low-risk for the illness. In Maryland, drive-through coronavirus testing sites are now open to all residents, whether or not they show signs of illness. In contrast, Oregon officials say that generally only people with symptoms should be tested, even front-line health-care workers. Experts warn that the lack of a unified national strategy as there is with the flu has left Americans uncertain about whether and how to be tested, which is hampering reopening plans.


Friday, June 5th

The following has been learned this week.

  • Per the Florida Department of Health, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection, and as of Friday, June 5th, the state now has 61,488 cases testing positive for COVID-19 (spiking this past week), with 10,794 requiring hospitalization and 2,660 deaths. The breakdown of confirmed cases in our tri-county area is:

    • Sumter County: 253 cases (up by 8 cases), holding at 17 deaths — age range 17 — was 97, now 92 ???
    • Lake County: 291 cases (a jump of 46 cases), holding at 15 deaths — age range 1 — was 86, now 98
    • Marion County: 233 cases (a jump of 39 cases), 8 deaths (up by 2)age range 0 — was 96, now 97

    Discrepancy for Sumter County may be a result of the tweaking of how the numbers are now determined. Cases for Sumter are up, but minimal compared to the jumps made in Lake and Marion Counties. One striking statistic for Sumter County is that 71% of the cases are male. (You guys getting sloppy in following preventative guidelines?) The age range for both Lake and Marion Counties has increased, indicating that more seniors are being stricken.
     

  • A study that found hydroxychloroquine was dangerous for hospitalized covid-19 patients was retracted by its authors, who said they were  unable to complete an independent audit of the hospital data underpinning their analysis. It still stands that the drug did not prevent anyone from getting the virus. The WHO ill resume trials.
     

  • The federal government undercounted the number of virus deaths in U.S. nursing homes saying there were 26,000 resident deaths and 449 staff deaths to date. But that number is significantly lower than other estimates, as they capture only a part of total coronavirus deaths associated with nursing homes. According to the latest NBC News tally, nearly 40,000 coronavirus deaths are associated with nursing homes, assisted living and other long-term care facilities since the beginning of the pandemic — representing almost 40 percent of all coronavirus deaths in the U.S. The NBC News tally is also likely to be an undercount, as a handful of states have still not released their nursing home death tolls. In addition, being decimated by the number of COVID-19 cases cases and deaths, they are pleading for more tests and protective equipment.
     
  • As the crisis has unfolded, scientists have discovered more evidence about a strange and worrying feature of the coronavirus. While many people develop a cough, fever and loss of taste and smell, others have no symptoms at all and never realize they're carrying Covid-19. A BBC News report shared the results of a study that shed light on the mystery of asymptomatic "silent spreaders", as well as some insights into how the virus spread even without contact.
     
  • There is now a growing body of evidence to support the theory that the novel coronavirus can infect blood vessels, which could explain not only the high prevalence of blood clots, strokes, and heart attacks, but also provide an answer for the diverse set of head-to-toe symptoms that have emerged — Covid-19 may be a vascular disease rather than respiratory one. Also, see the chart that shows all the head-to-toe Covid-19 symptoms known right now (5/18).
     
  • Even with all your covid-19 preparation, there is still a chance that someone in the household will become infected. So, how-to-keep-others-safe? ecd=wnl_spr_060220&ctr=wnl-spr-060220_nsl-Bodymodule_Position6&mb=ZrAEWS47zRVfaKwzTOgfr@HnVev1imbCnc5/9H4RWiE="> plan for an "isolation zone". WebMD tells you how you can do it.
     
  • There still is no evidence that animals can spread the virus to their humans, but it was reported Thursday that the first dog in the U.S. has tested positive for COVID-19 and a cat has also tested positive (cats are more susceptible) The owners had the virus or had antibodies to it. So remember, if you aren't feeling well and you want to snuggle with your pet, follow CDC guidelines more stringently. And if you have the virus, isolate yourself from your pet as much as possible so you don't pass it to your pet. Good news is that animals that contracted the virus had mild cases and recovered... so far.... If curious about how animals are tested for the virus, read Researchers study how often household pets contract COVID-19. Pet remain big pandemic (or anytime) stress reducers.


See what had been learned about the virus in
May.


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